MUTITJULU

Mutitjulu

Mutitjulu in Australia's Northern Territory is an Indigenous Australian community at the eastern end of Uluru (also known as Ayers Rock). It is named after a knee-shaped water-filled rock hole at the base of Uluru, and is located in the Uluru-Kata Tjuta National Park. Its people are traditional owners and joint managers of the park with Parks Australia. At the 2011 census, Mutitjulu had a population of 296, of which 218 (71.2%) were Aboriginal.[1]

The majority of the Anangu (people) are Pitjantjatjara but there are also associated YankunytjatjaraLuritja and Ngaanyatjarra people with the languages spoken being Pitjantjatjara, Luritja and Yangkunytjatjara. Arrernte people also have a traditional relationship with Uluru.

The community has a school which services students from Year 1 to Year 7, and a high school, Nyangatjatjara Secondary College. The cultural traditions of Mutitjulu dictate that once reaching adolescence, children must be taught only with peers of the same sexNyangatjatjara College is a boarding school, and hosts the young men and young women of the community separately in consecutive semesters.

Like with the housing and health situations, Anglo-European education standards at Mutitjulu, as with other Indigenous Australian communities, is far lower than the Australian average.

Languages spoken are PitjantjatjaraLuritja and Yankunytjatjara. Communication between the languages, however, is not difficult as most residents speak several languages and these Aboriginal languages are closely related, all being mutually intelligibly varieties of the Western Desert Language.

Efforts are made to preserve traditional customs, including traditional languages, but some English is spoken by most residents. The level of English literacy by Mutitjulu residents is higher than in many Indigenous Australian communities primarily due to the regular exposure to tourists at Uluru.

Mutitjulu community run a number of guided tours for tourists visiting Uluru, who show tourists certain sites, and share Tjukurpa the story of Uluru, as well as of its inhabitants. These tours are called Anangu Tours, from the Pitjantjatjara word Anangu which means "people".

Access to the community is controlled by Anangu, who do not allow visitors to go to Mutitjulu community without permission. The community reserves the right to forbid visitors from entering their land.

The people of Mutitjulu are also the traditional owners of Uluru, and have an art exhibition there which tourists can freely visit and buy paintings and other artefacts.

SOURCE (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mutitjulu)