Blog Archives

BLACK JOCKS DECEMBER 17th – 21st

WARNING CONTAINS INFORMATION ABOUT DECEASED PEOPLE

December 17

on this day in 1901: the Federal Pacific Islanders Act became law.

On this day in 1984: Over 76,000 square kilometres of traditional land at Maralinga in western South Australia was returned to the traditional Aboriginal owners.

On this day in 1996: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Affairs Minister, Senator John Herron, today announced an overhaul of the Heritage Protection Act,designed to prevent another Hindmarsh Island saga. Under the changes, theCommonwealth Heritage Protection Act would be retained as an ‘Act of lastresort’, to apply where State and Territory schemes do not meet national minimum standards, or where national interest considerations exist.

On this day in 1996: Queensland Health Minister, Mike Horan, announced on this day that the State Government would advertise across Queensland immediately to fill the membership of Queensland’s new Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Council.

December 18

On this day in 1838: A letter in the Australian newspaper attested to the racial hatred of Aboriginal people by early settlers: “I look on the blacks as a set of monkies, and the earlier they are exterminated from the face of the earth the better. I would never consent to hang a white man for a black one.”

On this day in 1943: The Army prepared instructions for personnel to be based at each of the Army-controlled Aboriginal settlements. These personnel would maintain a roll of all labourers showing their ‘European’ and Aboriginal names, clan, the names of their dependants, the number of their blood slide (used to monitor malarial infection) and any general remarks.

On this day in 1994: A replica of Captain James Cook’s ship ‘Endeavour’ arrived in Sydney to celebrate the ‘discovery’ in 1770 of the land in which Aboriginal people had lived for more than 60,000 years. Aboriginal protesters attached a banner to the fence of the Botanical Gardens reading ‘Don’t Forget White Australia has a Black History’.

On this day in 1997: The Minister for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Affairs, Senator John Herron, released the names of the 25 members of the Council for Aboriginal Reconciliation for the Council’s final three-year term, which ended on 31st December 2000. Senator Herron confirmed the appointment of Ms Evelyn Scott as Chairperson and Sir Gus Nossal as Deputy Chairperson of the Council.

December 19

On this day in 1938: Aboriginal artist Albert Namatjira had 41 watercolour paintings on exhibition at the Fine Art Society Gallery in Melbourne. All 41 paintings were sold.

On this day in 2000: The Queensland Government signed a Justice Agreement committing it to the goal of halving the number of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in prisons and appearing before the courts.

On this day in 2002: Victorian-based Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Commissioner Chairman Geoff Clark was re-elected as ATSIC Chairman for a second term on this day.

December 20

On this day in 1836: The Executive Council of NSW cleared Major Thomas Mitchell of responsibility after his expedition killed a large number of Aboriginal people on the Murray River.

On this day in 1889: Despite the plan of the Queensland government to outlaw the importation of Pacific Island labour after 1890, a Royal Commission reported on this day the labour was essential. It stated that ‘if all coloured labour be withdrawn from the plantations the extinction of the sugar industry must speedily follow’.

On this day in 1895: Law was enacted in South Australia to limit the use of opium by Aboriginal people for medicinal purposes. On this day in 2001: ATSIC said Essendon AFL coach Kevin Sheedy should be commended for his forward-thinking proposal to expand the draft system and allow AFL clubs to recruit an additional two Indigenous players as rookies. Mr Sheedy’s proposal would allow Indigenous players recruited from remote areas more time to adjust to the pressures and demands of a professional lifestyle and big city living.

On this day in 2001: Native title, education and law and justice issues were among the priority areas of need identified at the first historic meeting of a new body representing the heads of the major Western Australian Government departments delivering services to Aboriginal people and State ATSIC leaders on this day. WA Indigenous Affairs Minister Alan Carpenter, who chaired the Indigenous Affairs Advisory Committee (IAAC), said the group had the power to improve the lives of thousands of Aboriginal people in the State.

December 21

On this day in 1835: Protector of Aborigines George Augustus Robinson noted in his journal of the conditions for the Tasmanian Aborigines at Flinders Island: “it is cruel not to provide abundantly for this remnant of the aboriginal race… having placed them on an isolated spot. The least we ought to do is to abundantly supply their wants”.

On this day in 1840: Four Aboriginal people were shot by J.F. Francis in the Pyrenes, according to George Robertson’s listing of ‘Aborigines – Outrages Against’ in the 1879 Australian Dictionary of Dates and Men of the Time.

On this day in 1974: An adult male skeleton believed to be some 30,000 years old was discovered at Lake Mungo in NSW. The skeleton was named Mungo Man.

BLACK JOCKS DECEMBER 10th – 14th 2012

WARNING CONTAINS INFORMATION ABOUT DECEASED PEOPLE

 DECEMBER JOCKS

 

December 10 

On this day in 1985: Canon Arthur Malcolm was ordained as Australia’s first Aboriginal Bishop. On this day in 1996: Close to 50,000 Indigenous Australian voters turned out for the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Commission elections. On this day in 1997: Women from around Australia converged on Alice Springs for the first national Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Well Women’s Health Workshop. On this day in 1997: A spectacular statement of grassroots support for native title and reconciliation materialised in the national capital on this day. The Sea of Hands comprised over 60,000 human-sized hands ‘planted’ on wire sticks in the Parliament House lawns in Canberra as a symbolic ‘show of hands’ by thousands of Australians. On this day in 2002: South Australian Premier Mike Rann announced the State Government would hand a significant area of land in the State’s far north-west to the traditional Aboriginal owners in March 2003. Mr Rann said the handover was the single largest land rights handover in South Australia since the Maralinga lands in 1984. On this day in 2002: Queensland Minister for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Policy Judy Spence announced $3.47 million funding for the Diversion from Custody Program in Queensland on this day. The funding was designed to provide culturally appropriate alternatives to detention for intoxicated and homeless Indigenous people.

December 11

On this day in 1831: Charles Rodius published the first of a series of lithographed portraits of Aboriginal people. On this day in 1960: Birth of renowned Aboriginal photographer and international film maker, Tracy Moffat, at Mount Gravatt, Queensland. On this day in 1997: A formal alliance between Aboriginal and Environmental groups was created in Alice Springs to fight new uranium mines across Australia, especially with a view to starting a network of resources for blockades. On this day in 1997: Education Minister, Bob Quinn opened the inaugural meeting of MACATSIE, a new body designed to advise the State Government on matters relating to Indigenous education. Minister Quinn also announced the full membership of the ministerial Advisory Council on Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Education. On this day in 1997: The Cape York Land Council’s negotiation team met in Cairns to develop a position for negotiations with Chevron surrounding the proposed gas pipeline. On this day in 1789: Colbee, who was captured with Bennelong by Captain Arthur Phillip, escaped after being held captive for 17 days.

December 12

On this day in 2012 SBS began broadcasting dedicated Aboriginal TV free to air on SBS4. The service replaces the Aboriginal run media NITV Corporation bringing Australia’s Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples under the Australian flagship Special Broadcasting Services with Australia’s other racial groupings. On this day in 1817: Governor Macquarie recommended to the Colonial Office that Australia be used in future for the name of the new continent. On this day in 2001: The Minister for Immigration and Multicultural and Indigenous Affairs, Philip Ruddock, met with the British Minister for the Arts, the Rt Hon Baroness Blackstone, in London on this day to discuss the progress of an agreement on the repatriation of Indigenous human remains from Britain to Australia. On this day in 2001: The ATSIC Commissioner for Women, Ms Christine Williams, called for improved services following the release of a report which revealed disturbing levels of discrimination occurring against Indigenous women in NSW. Her comments followed the release by the Anti Discrimination Board (ADB) and Wirringa Baiya Aboriginal Women’s Legal Centre of a report entitled: “Discrimination- have you got all day.” The document was based on interviews with 73 Indigenous women from 10 urban and rural communities in NSW.

December 13

On this day in 2002: The Beattie Government announced it would invest $2.66 million directly into 19 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities to implement initiatives outlined in Meeting Challenges, Making Choices, the government’s response to the Cape York Justice Study.

December 14

On this day in 1974: A National bilingual education campaign for Aboriginal children was announced. On this day in 1995: Jervis Bay National Park and botanic gardens were handed back to the Aboriginal community in an official ceremony in 1995. On this day in 2001: A High Court decision in Melbourne approved the Yorta Yorta people’s application to appeal an earlier Federal Court decision on their native title claim. The application required the High Court to determine whether the  Federal Court had erred in legal principle in not giving enough weight to oral evidence and, as a result, concluding that the traditional law and custom of the Yorta Yorta had been abandoned at or about 1881.

BLACK JOCKS DECEMBER 1st – 9th 2012

 WARNING CONTAINS INFORMATION ABOUT DECEASED PEOPLE

 DECEMBER JOCKS

 December 1

On this day in 1999: Thirteen Brisbane people staged their own trial against uranium mining company, ERA, in King George Square, Brisbane. They had previously been arrested for their part in protesting against the Jabiluka uranium mine. On this day in 1984: The New South Wales Government handed over title deeds for 230 hectares of land to the Wallaga Lake Aboriginal community. It was the first hand-over since Land Rights Legislation was passed in NSW in 1983. On this day in 1986: Former country and western singer Ernie Bridge became the first Aboriginal Cabinet Minister to be elected by the Labour Caucus to the Burke Ministry in Western Australia. On this day in 1994: The Aboriginal All-Stars Football Team comfortably defeated Collingwood Football Club by 20 points in Darwin. Final scores were [13.10] 88 to [10.8] 68. On this day in 1999: In the Federal Court, Justice Drummond ratified native title agreements between the Queensland Government and the Mualgal people of Moa Island and the Saibai people of Saibai Island in the Torres Strait. On this day in 2002: A formal settlement was reached on this day, recognising the native title rights of the Karajarri people over an area of land south of Broome. The decision was a consent determination between the Karajarri people, the State of Western Australia and a number of other parties including the Shire of Broome, Telstra, Western Australia, Western Agricultural Industries and pearling companies. On this day in 2002: National Aborigine of the Year and incumbent NSW West Zone Commissioner, Steve Gordon, was re-elected on this day for an unprecedented fifth term on the national ATSIC Board of Commissioners.

December 2

On this day in 1688: William Dampier, British mariner, left King Sound for Sumatra. After anchoring in Cygnet Cove, he spent nine weeks repairing his ship and making detailed observations of the country and its inhabitants. It was here he made his notorious comment about Aborigines ‘the miserablest people in the world’. They seemed to have no tools, but constructed fish weirs and dug wells, from which Dampier’s crew replenished their own water casks. On this day in 1993: Ancestral remains were returned to Eaglehawk Neck from the Tasmanian Museum. On this day in 1997: The Northern Territory Government introduced a six-month trial for an Aboriginal Languages Interpreter Service. On this day in 1999: “The time has come to examine the impact of the extinguishment of native title and the workability problems emerging from the amended Native Title Act (NTA)”, the ATSIC Chairman, Gatjil Djerrkura, said on this day. Mr Djerrkura told the Parliamentary Joint Committee on Native Title and the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Land Fund that it should focus its efforts on these matters, along with the impairment of native title rights and the effect of the NTA on land management.

December 3

On this day in 2000: ATSIC’s full board held a historic meeting with the Prime Minister in Canberra. Commissioner Jenny Pryor described themeeting at The Lodge as “a constructive sign that ATSIC can improveits relations with the current Federal Government to advance the interests of our people.”On this day in 2002: The Federal Government announced a range of new houses and essential services would be provided for Palm Island’s Indigenous communities at an estimated cost of more than $7 million following a decision to extend the ATSIC Army Community Assistance Program (AACAP) to the island. On this day in 2003: Pioneer Aboriginal pop star and country music singer Jimmy Little was honoured for his lifetime contribution to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander arts.

December 4

On this day in 1972: Thirty Federal Labour parliamentarians promised physical action top event the removal of the Aboriginal Tent Embassy. On this day in 1994: Prime Minister Paul Keating announced the establishment of the Aboriginal Land Fund to provide financial contribution for the acquisition and management of Indigenous land. Funds were to be administered by the Indigenous Land Corporation. On this day in 1997: The first Aboriginal magistrate, Patricia O’Shane, announced her retirement from the bench. On this day in 1997: Sports Minister, Mick Veivers announced a $500,000 Government initiative to employ nine Aboriginal officers within the Office of Sport and Recreation. Veivers said the role of the Aboriginal Sport and Recreation officers would be to help boost sports training programs as well as the development of facilities in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities. On this day in 2003: It was announced Aboriginal rock art believed to date back 11,000 years had been discovered in a cave in Tasmania’s south-west.

December 5

On this day in 1988: At the Burunga sports and cultural festival Prime Minister Bob Hawke was presented with a petition framed by bark paintings. Now known as the Burunga Statement, the petition called for recognition of a wide range of Indigenous rights including a negotiated Treaty. The Prime Minister respondedwith a commitment to a negotiated Treaty with Aboriginal people.

December 6

On this day in 1993: Paul Keating told a conference of the NSW Branch of the Labor Party:”The history and contemporary reality of Aboriginal Australia is a blight on our reputation, our traditions of fairness, social justice and inclusion, and our selfesteem. It is, therefore, a true Labour cause, and I call on the entire Labour movement in Australia to get behind it.” On this day in 2002: A handover ceremony of a Men’s Health Centre was held on this day with the Minister for Immigration, Multicultural and Indigenous Affairs Philip Ruddock, at the community of Yarralin situated approximately 400 kms southwest of Katherine. The Centre, costing $125,000, was constructed as part of the ATSIC/Army Community Assistance Program (AACAP) whichinvolved major housing and infrastructure work at both Yarralin and the nearbyoutstation of Lingara.

December 7

On this day in 1963: National Aborigines Day was celebrated with speeches in Martin Place, Sydney. On this day in 2002: A new resource guide, developed by the Department of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Policy (DATSIP) and the Indigenous Land Corporation (ILC), was launched on this day. The guide was designed to help Indigenous land holders realise the potential of their land. On this day in 2002: The National Aboriginal and Islander Day Observance Committee (NAIDOC) award for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Person of the Year was presented to ATSIC Commissioner for the Western Zone NSW Steve Gordon. On this day in 2002: The Wagiman people of the Northern Territory were handed back country by the Federal Minister for Immigration, Multicultural and Indigenous Affairs, Mr Philip Ruddock.

December 8

On this day in 1977: A NSW Aboriginal Health Service Survey revealed that 25 percent of Sydney’s Aboriginal children were so undernourished that they could suffer permanent brain damage. The children were part of the 20,000 Aboriginal population living in poor conditions in Redfern, in the heart of Sydney’s urban wealth. The survey identified 64% of these children as anaemic, 60% as having a parasitic bowel infection and 32% as having a least one perforated eardrum. On this day in 1987: The establishment of a Royal Commission to investigate the deaths of 44 Aboriginal people while in custody since 1980. On this day in 2001: The first Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander youth cricket team to tour England was named in Brisbane on this day. The 14-man squad played a three week nine game tour of England which retraced some of the footsteps of the first Australian cricket team to play in England, an all Aboriginal side in1868. The youth team was captained by Barry Firebrace, 20, of Victoria.

December 9

On this day in 1972 the Northern Territory Lands Right Act was passed by the Frazer Government The Act was introduced on 16 October 1975 and became law in 1976. Under the act, more than 50% of the Northern Territory was returned to traditional Aboriginal owners in the following 30 years.The NT Land Rights Act gives Aboriginal people a strong say over what should happen on their land, through the principle of informed consent. It allows traditional owners to keep their culture strong and to negotiate constructively with governments and developers over mining and infrastructure projects. On this day in 1972: The full bench of the ACT Supreme Court judged that the Trespass on Commonwealth Lands Ordinance (used to dismantle the Aboriginal Tent Embassy) had been wrongly applied. On this day in 1997: The Australian Broadcasting Authority granted a Community Broadcast Licence to the Mount Isa Aboriginal Media Association for MOB-fm.  On this day in 2002: Torres Strait Island leaders called on Premier Peter Beattie to explain the Queensland government’s decision to abandon six Native Title determinations in the Torres Strait. Speaking on Radio 4MW on this day, Torres Strait Regional Authority (TSRA) Chairperson, Terry Waia, called onthe Queensland government to take full responsibility for the cancellation of the determinations planned for later that month. On this day in 2002: People from the remote Aboriginal community of Kiwirrkurra in Western Australia began returning to their homes in the Western Desert, 19 months after severe flooding resulted in their evacuation to other parts of the country.

BLACK JOCKS 26th – 30th NOVEMBER 2012

WARNING CONTAINS INFORMATION ABOUT DECEASED PEOPLE

November, is filled with significant dates in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanderhistory. It is the

month in which Aboriginal people were evicted from the Cape Yorkcommunity of Mapoon, Oodgeroo Noonuccal was born, and Aboriginal cricketerEddie Gilbert bowled the great Sir Donald Bradman for a duck. These, and manyother historical events from around the country, are listed chronologically on pages 3-7. Over the next couple of pages, we’ve chosen some of the more interestingstories to highlight in more detail.

November 26

On this day in 1830: It was announced that after a campaign lasting seven weeks, in-volving 5,000 men (one-sixth of the population) and costing nearly thirty thousand pounds, the drive by Lieutenant Governor Arthur to round up Tasmanian Aborigines had netted exactly two people: a man and a boy.

On this day in 1996: In an historic ceremony, Mr Gatjil Djerrkuta, the present Chairman of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Commission, and his predecessor, Dr Lois O’Donoghue, accepted a resolution of apology from the National General Assembly of Local Government meeting in Canberra.

Born on this day in 1991 AFL player Joe Houghton Born On this day in 1986 Afl Eddie Betts Betts grew up in Kalgoorlie Moving to Melbourne as a teenager, he played in the 2003 Under 18 National Championships for Vic Metro as a 16 year old and was selected in the Under 18 All-Australian team. Whilst he was too young to be selected in the AFL draft he was later drafted 2004.

On this day in 1996: The Government’s apparent commitment to rushing comprehen-sive amendments to the ‘Native Title Act’ through Parliament without adequate consulta-tion and discussion, risks further confusion and opens the possibility for litigation, ATSIC Chairperson Miss Lois O’Donoghue said, ATSIC has released a discussion paper, ‘Proposed Amendments to the Native Title Act 1993 – Issues for Indigenous Peo-ples’, to provide information on the proposed amendments.

On this day in 2001: A Nyoongar elder committed to improving education for Aboriginal youth and elevating justice, health and seniors issues was honoured with a prestigious award from the WA State Government. Norman Charles Harris of Craigie was named winner of the Outstanding Service by an Individual category of the Community Services Industry Awards 2001.

 

November 27

Born on this day in 1980 NRL TY Williams in Innisfail, Queensland) is an Australian pro-fessional rugby league player for the North Queensland Cowboys in the National Rugby League competition.

On this day in 1838: Seven non-Indigenous men, previously tried and acquitted for the massacre of 28 Aboriginal people at Myall Creek, were charged again and found guilty.

On this day in 1857: Six Aboriginal people, including three women, were shot in the Up-per Dawson River region as part of an ongoing massacre of over 150 Aboriginal people in the area by the end of 1858.

On this day in 1993: The Julayinbul statement on ‘Indigenous Intellectual Property Rights’ was declared at Jingarra in the North-Eastern Coastal region of Australia.

On this day in 1997: Council for Aboriginal Reconciliation Chairperson, Patrick Dodson,

presented ‘Weaving the Threads’, Council’s second-term Report to Parliament.

On this day in 1997: Eminent Australian playwright and songwriter, Jimmy Chi, re-ceived the Australia Council’s prestigious Red Ochre Award for 1997 at a special ceremony in his home town of Broome, Western Australia.

On this day in 2003: Sweden agreed to repatriate the remains of 13 Aboriginal peo-ple brought to the Scandinavian country almost 100 years ago from Australia.

November 28

On this day in 1974: The Aboriginal Loans Commission was established.

On this day in 1998: The second World Indigenous Pathways Conference com-menced at the University of Southern Queensland. The conference provided the opportunity for Indigenous and non-Indigenous peoples from around the world to engage in discourse about issues such as identity, culture, reconciliation, multiculturalism and social activism.

On this day in 2000: The National Native Title Tribunal said the settlement of a 54,315 square kilometre native title application in the central desert region of Western Australia was further evidence that native title issues could be sorted out through negotiation rather than costly Court action. President Graeme Neate said the agreement with the Spinifex people formally ratified by the Federal Court on this day was a major step forward in set-tling many of Western Australia’s 133 remaining native title applications.

On this day in 2000: Victorian Minister for Aboriginal Affairs, Mr Keith Hamilton, officiallyopened the Kulin Nation Cultural Heritage Organisation in Thomas Street, Dandenong.

On this day in 2003: Queensland’s Mornington Island began severely restricting liquor sales in an attempt to reduce alcohol abuse in the community.

November 29

On this day in 1996: The publication ‘Reporting Race Issues in the Media’ was launched. It was initiated by the Queensland Anti-Discrimination Commission and funded by the Federal Race Discrimination Commissioner, Zita Antonios. It examined reporting of race issues over a twenty year period in the Courier Mail and the Cairns Post and analysed news broadcasts on Channels 2, 7, 9 and 10. It made a number of recom-mendations for change and suggests ways that Indigenous and ethnic communities and the media could work together more effectively.

On this day in 2001: The Queensland Government and the Torres Strait Regional Au-thority sealed a $36 million partnership to continue improving vital infrastructure on remote Torres Strait Islands. Minister for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Pol-icy, Judy Spence, and the chair of the Torres Strait Regional Authority (TSRA), Terry Waia, formalised an agreement to improve water, sewerage, waste disposal and housing subdivisions in Torres Strait.

On this day in 2003: A review of ATSIC recommended the board of Australia’s peak Indigenous body should be scrapped and replaced with a two-tier structure, giving more power to regional councils. On this day in 2008 Council of Australian Governments (COAG) meeting where state and federal heads announce they will contribute $806 million (federal) and $772 million (all states) into Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health over the next four years, the biggest single injection of Indigenous health spending in decades.

November 30

On this day 1986: Pope John Paul II endorsed Aboriginal land rights during his Pa-pal visit to Australia. In Alice Springs in his speech he said “lets not put off till tomorrow what we can do today”

Born on this day in 1917 Shadrach James Fitzroy VFL known as Shady James was the uncle of famous umpire, Glenn James. On this day in 1997: The Prime Minister addressed the nation to explain his Ten-Point Plan for Native Title.

On this day in 1998: The Australian Medical Association urged the Prime Minister to compliment his desire for a formal document of reconciliation with a comprehensive pro-gram to address the causes of ill health among Indigenous Australians.

On this day in 1998: The most significant gathering of Indigenous people to discuss is-sues relating to constitutional development in the Northern Territory got off to a strong start on this day. More than 120 delegates from all over the Territory met at Batchelor University at the Indigenous Constitutional Convention to take the principles contained within the Kalkaringl Statement one step further towards realisation.

On this day in 1999: The Sydney Morning Herald reported: “When all the anguish over the Sydney Olympics evaporates, and the opening ceremony is ready to begin, the audi-ence focus will be on the truth of the storytelling of one man, Stephen Page“. Mr Page was the Director of the Bangara Dance Theatre and responsible for the Indigenous com-ponents of the opening and closing ceremonies of the 2000 Games in Sydney.

On this day in 2001: The Narungga Aboriginal Progress Association (NAPA) organised a landmark meeting in the language of Narungga people. NAPA launched a seven-month old Language Reclamation Project. The meeting symbolised the maintenance of the Narungga language and its continuation through the generations.

 

BLACK JOCKS 19th – 23rd NOVEMBER 2012

WARNING CONTAINS INFORMATION ABOUT DECEASED PEOPLE

November, is filled with significant dates in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanderhistory. It is the month in which Aboriginal people were evi

cted from the Cape Yorkcommunity of Mapoon, Oodgeroo Noonuccal was born, and Aboriginal cricketer Eddie Gilbert bowled the great Sir Donald Bradman for a duck. These, and many other historical events from around the country, are listed chronologically on pages 3-17. Over the next couple of pages, we’ve chosen some of the more interesting stories to highlight in more detail.

November 19

1996: NSW Environment Minister, Pam Allan, announced that landmark legislation would be introduced to State Parliament to return ownership of five national parks to their tra-ditional owners without making any difference to park visitors.On this day in 1998: AAP reported on an upcoming three-day international swimming competition in Rio de Janeiro where Torres Strait Islander Kelly Denner, aged 15, would be the first Indigenous person to represent Australia.On this day in 1998: Activists from Timbarra Direct Action, the coordinating group for the campaign against the Timbarra Gold Mine project, protested outside the Annual Gen-eral Meeting of Ross Mining NL. The protest was against the construction of a gold mine on the Timbarra Plateau, an environmentallysensitive area that is the habitat of 28 endan-gered species as well as a site of significant Aboriginal heritage sites. On this day in 1999: The voices of Queensland’s future leaders echoed through Parlia-ment House with the focus of the discussion on reconciliation. Students from around the State took their places in the Queensland Youth Reconciliation Parliament to outline their vision for reconciliation with Indigenous Australians.

November 20

1987: The Chairperson of the Royal Commission into Aboriginal Deaths in Custody urged both State and Federal Governments to act immediately to stop deaths in custody, and not to wait for the Commissioners’ findings to be released.

November 21

1921: Social worker Mum Shirl (Shirley Colleen Smith, nee Perry), was born this day.On this day in 1975: The Queensland Government passed a Bill that authorised bauxitemining at Aurukun, an Aboriginal reserve situated at Archer Bay on Queensland’s Cape Yorke Peninsula. On this day in 1996: A major campaign of protest against the gold mining company, Ross Mining NL, was launched in Brisbane outside the company’s Annual General Meeting by representatives of the Bundjalung Aboriginal people and several north coast NSW and Queensland environmental groups. On this day in 1997: Australian churches had a moral mandate from the founder of the Christian church to speak on behalf of the poor, the marginalised and the dispossessed, according to Democrats’ Native Title spokesman, Senator John Woodley. Senator Wood-ley, the only ordained Minister to enter the Senate, told a Combined Churches Forum in Brisbane on this day they had a legitimate right to criticise the Howard government’s Wik ten-point plan On this day in 2004 Casey Donovan, at just 16 years of age, becomes the youngest and first female winner of Australian Idol. She releases Listen to Your Heart a few days later. On this day in 2004 Michael Long, a former Australian Rules footballer sets out on foot from Melbourne to Canberra to speak to Prime Minister John Howard and raise aware-ness of the plight of Aboriginal Australians. His walk becomes known as The Long Walk.

November 22

Born On this day in 1921: Social worker Mum Shirl (Shirley Colleen Smith, nee Perry), was a prominent Aboriginal Australian and activist committed to justice and welfare of Aboriginal Australians. She was a founding member of the Aboriginal Legal Service, Abo-riginal Medical Service, Aboriginal Tent Embassy, the Aboriginal Children’s Service,and the Aboriginal Housing Company in Redfern, a suburb of Sydney, Australia. Born on this day in 1973 in Shoalhaven, New South Wales Rugby league and Union player Andrew Walker Australian rugby footballer who represented his country in both rugby league and rugby union – a dual code international. Walker was the first dual code international to represent his country at rugby league before representing rugby union. That said, he began his career as a rugby union player for Randwick, where he played alongside Eddie Jones in their 1991 premiership-winning season. Walker became Austra-lia’s 40th dual code international when he made his Wallaby debut against New Zealand in July 2000 On This day in 2009 The government announces its support of the new representative body for Aboriginal people, called the National Congress of Australia’s First Peoples (NCAFP Born on this day in 1984 AFL footy player Matthew Stokes played fro the Cats. On this day in 1975: The Queensland Government passed a Bill that authorised bauxite mining at Aurukun, an Aboriginal reserve situated at Archer Bay on Queensland’s Cape Yorke Peninsula. On this day in 1996: A major campaign of protest against the gold mining company, Ross Mining NL, was launched in Brisbane outside the company’s Annual General Meeting by representatives of the Bundjalung Aboriginal people and several north coast NSW and Queensland environmental groups. On this day in 1997: Australian churches had a moral mandate from the founder of the Christian church to speak on behalf of the poor, the marginalised and the dispossessed, according to Democrats’ Native Title spokesman, Senator John Woodley. Senator Wood-ley, the only ordained Minister to enter the Senate, told a Combined Churches Forum in Brisbane on this day they had a legitimate right to criticise the Howard government’s Wik ten-point plan.

November 23

On this Day in 1946: The Federal Government announced the establishment of a rocket range near Woomera in South Australia. The Minister responsible, J Dedman, stated that there were no risks to the Aboriginal people living in the area. On this Day in 1998: Honouring Emily Kame Kngwarreye Alhalkere - Paintings from Utopia, a Queensland Art Gallery Travelling Exhibition held at the National Gallery of Vic-toria, ended. On this day in 2000: Queensland Minister for Women’s Policy and Minister for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Policy, Judy Spence, met with women from Mt Isa and the Gulf who added their journeys to the reconciliation map in Women Reconcile, a book that brings together 18 very different lives. On this day in 2000: The United Nations Committee Against Torture (CAT) released its Conclusions and Recommendations following consideration of Australia’s compliance with its obligations under the Convention against Torture and Other Cruel, Inhuman or Degrading Treatment or Punishment. The Committee expressed concern about mandatory sentencing legislation and its impact on Indigenous people as well as concern about the lack of review mechanisms, the use of physical restraints and allega-tions of excessive use of force and allegations of intimidation.

BLACK JOCKS NOVEMBER 12th – 16th

 WARNING CONTAINS INFORMATION ABOUT DECEASED PEOPLE

 November, is filled with significant dates in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanderhistor

y. It is the month in which Aboriginal people were evicted from the Cape Yorkcommunity of Mapoon, Oodgeroo Noonuccal was born, and Aboriginal cricketerEddie Gilbert bowled the great Sir Donald Bradman for a duck. These, and manyother historical events from around the country, are listed chronologically on pages 3-17. Over the next couple of pages, we’ve chosen some of the more interestingstories to highlight in more detail.

November 12 On this day in 1824: Peace returned to the pastoral plains west of the Blue Mountains, with the end of four months of martial law imposed by Governor Brisbane. He had de-clared martial law following an outbreak of fighting between Aborigines and white settlers.

On this day in 1834: Aboriginal trackers (Migo and Mollydobbin) were utilised for the first time to find a lost boy in the bush near Fremantle in Western Australia.

On this day in 1998: The Minister for Immigration and Multicultural Affairs, and Minister-Assisting the Prime Minister for Reconciliation, Philip Ruddock, launched the National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Arts Policy Brochure in Sydney.

On this day in 2001: Banduk Marika was presented with the Red Ochre Award. The Red Ochre Award is recognised by the Indigenous community as one of the most prestig-ious accolades paid to an Indigenous artist.

 November 13 On this day in 1996: The title to the first area of land purchased (nationally) by the In-digenous Land Corporation on behalf of Indigenous people was handed to representa-tives of the Noongar traditional landowners in Perth on this day. Born on this day AFL player Matthew Whelan is a former professional Australian rules football player. Wearing the number 45 jersey, Whelan was reliable defender/back pocket known by Demons fans simply as the “Wheels”. He also earned the nickname “Wrecker” (after Whelan the Wrecker) for his big hits (often on big name players) and tough and uncompromisingly defensive style of play. His tackling style, to drop the shoul-der, resulted in spectacular, almost spear tackle like throws of opponents.

 On this day in 1997: Tasmanian Aboriginal spokesperson Michael Mansell arrived back from Britain and the United Nations in Geneva after being part of a delegation of In-digenous people drawing world attention to the ‘Native Title Amendment Bill 1997′. In a constitutionally unprecedented move, Australian Greens Senator for Tasmania, Bob Brown, said he would ask the Senate to allow Mansell to speak on the floor during the second-reading debate on the legislation.

On this day in 1998: The Minister for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Policy, Judy Spence, said on this day the facts about Palm Island highlighted the outlandish nature of the Guinness Book of Records’ claim it was the most violent place on earth outside a combat zone. The ‘record’ was apparently based on an article published in the Sunday Times magazine in the UK earlier this year, but that article was discredited because it was founded on fictitious data, Ms Spence said.

November 14 On this day 1998: John Moriarty, Chairman of the Australia Council’s Aboriginal and Tor-res Strait Islander Arts Board (ATSIAB) opened a unique art exhibition today in Cairns on this day. Ninety Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander prisoners showed 260 art works featuring the stories of their childhoods in a unique exhibition funded by the Australia Council, the Federal Government’s arts funding and advisory body.

On this day in 2001: The Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Commission and the Tas-manian Government agreed to develop a partnership agreement to further strengthen and improve the economic, social and cultural outcomes for the State’s Aboriginal population. A meeting was held in Hobart on tis day between the ATSIC Board of Com-missioners and Tasmanian Premier, Mr Jim Bacon. Premier Bacon discussed the founda-tions of the agreement at the first ever meeting in Tasmania of the ATSIC Board and signed a communiqué which formed the basis of the partnership agreement.

On this day in 2001: The opening of an Aboriginal Heritage Walk Trail at the Specta-cles Wetland, Beeliar Regional Park, in Perth’s southern suburbs. Opening the trail on this day, WA Environment and Heritage Minister Judy Edwards said the trail allowed for the unique interpretation of the ecologically rich environment of the Spectacles from the perspective of Aboriginal people.

November 15 On this day in 1832: A group of Aboriginal people lead by resistance fighter Yagan es-caped from a small island off the coast of Freemantle.

On this day in 1963: Queensland police evicted Aboriginal people from the Mapoon-community and razed their buildings to allow bauxite mining to occur. On this day in 1996: Senator John Herron, Minister for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Is-lander Affairs, set out the Commonwealth Government’s broad policy on Indigenous affairs in his Lyons Lecture in Canberra, saying: “As a Government we be-lieve in economic independence and restoration of self esteem”.

On this day in 2002: Art lovers from Perth gained a unique opportunity to experience the abstract impressions of artist David Edward Conolan, complemented by the colours and creativity of Aboriginal art. Conolan’s ‘Outback to the Sea’ exhibition was based on a visit to the Punmu community to work with the children as part of a national Year of the Out-back initiative.

November 16 On this day in 1894: The police and Jandamarra’s force of about 50 warriors fought a major battle in Windjana Gorge. The police withdrew, thinking they had killed Jan-damarra, but he had escaped, badly wounded, among the maze of caves along the gorge. He subsequently recovered and, now a great embarrassment to the police, he easily eluded capture by retreating to the broken country of his homeland, taunting police from the safety of the cliff tops.

 On this day in 1949: Aboriginal singer Harold Blair criticised the Australian nation for their bad treatment of Australian Indigenous people. On this day in 1997: “Wajehla Dubay – Women Speaking”, Aboriginal Women’s Es-says, Stories and Poems, was launched at the Minjungbai Cultural Centre, South Tweed Heads.

On this day in 1998: Australians for Native Title and Reconciliation (ANTAR) announced on this day that Lesley Williams, an Aboriginal woman from Gympie, would address a public meeting in Brisbane to expose Queensland’s Aboriginal Welfare Fund and the scandal of the Stolen Wages.

On This day in 2009 The Prime Minister Kevin Rudd says sorry to the Forgotten Aus-tralians which include migrants and Indigenous people who were victims of abuse in or-phanages and institutions between 1930 and 1970. The Forgotten Australians suffered similar abuse as the members of the Stolen Generations.

BLACK JOCKS NOVEMBER 1st – 5th

WARNING CONTAINS INFORMATION ABOUT DECEASED PEOPLE

November, is filled with significant dates in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander history. It is the mo

nth in which Aboriginal people were evicted from the Cape Yorkcommunity of Mapoon, Oodgeroo Noonuccal was born, and Aboriginal cricketer Eddie Gilbert bowled the great Sir Donald Bradman for a duck. These, and many other historical events from around the country, are listed chronologically on pages 3-17. Over the next couple of pages, we’ve chosen some of the more interesting stories to highlight in more detail.

November 1

On this day 1934: The Federal Government ordered Northern Territory police to stop chaining Aboriginal prisoners.

November 2

On this day in 1962: The white people of the Northern Territory town of Elliott withdrew their children from the local school and demanded that Aboriginal children be re-moved. Six white children and five Aboriginal children were enrolled at the school, 800 kilometres south of Darwin. The white parents stated they were worried about hygiene.

On this day in 1998: The Jabiluka Aboriginal landowners, failed in their challenge to the legality of mining leases and uranium exports from mines inside Kakadu National Park, announced their intent to continue their legal fight. Justice Ronald Sackville of the Federal Court found against them after senior traditional owner, Yvonne Margarula, chal-lenged the validity of the leases and export licences for uranium mined on their land.

On this day in 1998: A new Legal Studies CD-ROM was launched in Queensland to train indigenous welfare officers. The CD, Introduction to the Legal System, was specifically designed to help indigenous people working within our legal system.

On this day in 1999: Judy Spence, Queensland Minister for Aboriginal and Islander Af-fairs Policy, launched the ‘New Directions – Aboriginal Australia and Business’ exhibition at the Queensland Museum in Brisbane today.

On this day in 1999: The Northern and Central Land Councils and the Northern Terri-tory Government signed a 198-year lease providing land tenure for the Darwin to Alice Springs railway corridor. The Agreement covered Aboriginal land and Native Title lands.

November 3

Born on this day In 1920 Oodgeroo Noonuccal (born Kathleen Jean Mary Ruska, for-merly Kath Walker) 1920 – 16 September 1993) was an Australian poet, political activist, artist and educator. She was also a campaigner for Aboriginal rights. Oodgeroo was best known for her poetry, and was the first Aboriginal Australian to publish a book of verse

On this day in 1987: The Association of Northern and Central Australia Aboriginal Artists (ANCAAA) was set up to promote the production of Aboriginal art for the benefit of the artists.

On this day in 1996: The Honourable John Herron, Liberal Senator for Queensland, was sworn in as Federal Minister for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Affairs.

On this day in 1998: The launch of City of Port Phillip’s Memorandum of Under-standing with the Port Phillip Indigenous community, by Ann Henderson, MinisterResponsible for Aboriginal Affairs. The Memorandum was the first to be signed by a met-ropolitan council in Victoria.

On this day in 1999: The announcement of a major international award for socially responsible tourism to the Aboriginal Art and Culture Centre at the prestigious tourism trade fair, Internationale Tourismus Bourse (ITB). Federal Minister for Sport and Tourism, Jackie Kelly, congratulated the centre based in Alice Springs.

On this day in 2001: Prime Minister John Howard and ATSIC chair Geoff Clark an-nounced that Australian cricket team captain Steve Waugh and Test fast bowler Jason Gillespie would take opposing sides in a historic cricket match in Canberra.

November 4

On this day in 1978: Two weeks of direct confrontation between the federal and Queen-sland governments over management of two Aboriginal reserves ended in a compro-mise reached between the Prime Minister, Mr Fraser, and the Queensland Premier, Mr Bjelke-Petersen. The deadlock, which began when Queensland announced that it would take over the Aurukun and Mornington Island missions from the Uniting Church, was re-solved with the former reserves each becoming a local government area run by a local council. Under the agreement, the two communities were to be granted special leases, ‘to secure the preservation of the people’s traditional rights, use and occupancy of the land’. The Federal minister for Aboriginal Affairs, Mr Viner, warned that the Commonwealth would acquire the areas compulsorily if dissatisfied with the proposed leases’ terms, and state law on the agreement.

November 5

On this day in 1946: The first industrial strike by Aboriginal people in the Pilbara re-gion took place.

On this day in 1972: Minister for Interior Mr Hunt announced the Government’s intention to bring in an Ordinance which would ‘fill a need in relation to the law regarding trespass on Commonwealth lands in Canberra’ – referring to the recent establishment of the Abo-riginal Tent Embassy on the lawns of Parliament House. The Ordinance would make it an offence to camp on unleased Commonwealth land within the city.

On this day in 1986: The Gurindji people received inalienable freehold title to almost all of Wave Hill station, called Daguragu.

On this day in 1993: The first compulsory Aboriginal Studies Program in Tasmania was introduced to Cosgrove High School in Hobart.

On this day in 1998: ATSIC Commissioner, Preston Thomas, told a parliamentary com-mittee that the Government’s Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Heritage Protec-tion Bill 1998 was “contrary to Indigenous interests and strongly opposed by the Com-mission”. Mr Thomas was supporting an ATSIC submission to the Joint Parliamentary Committee on Native.

Black Jocks 26th- 31st August 2012

AUGUST 26

On this day 1966:

Two hundred Gurindji stockmen at Wave Hill cattle station in the Northern Territory went on strike, claiming a wage increase from $5 to $10 per week, to $50 per week. There were about 1,500 Aborigines employed as stockmen and domestic staff. Aboriginal stockmen wanted full award wages to be paid on all cattle stations.

On this day 1998:

Following Senator Aden Ridgeway’s maiden speech and the Government’s negotiations with the Democrats, Federal Parliament passed a declaration of “deep and sincere regret” for the past injustices to Aboriginal people.

On this day 2002:

Aboriginal elder Alby Clarke began a 3000 kilometre bicycle trek. The 67 year old had been afflicted by diabetes and had beaten the disease, and embarked on an epic journey to his home with the Gunditjmara community, near Warrnambool in western Victoria.

 

AUGUST 27

On this day 1841:

50 Aboriginal people were killed on the banks of the Rufus River bypolice and volunteers sent to protect overlanders. The party had been sent from Adelaide to this southwest region of NSW after reports that men and cattle had been killed there. They opened fire when a party of about 150 Aborigines advanced ‘with their spears quivering’.

 

On this day 1970:

The Federal Government declared it would not recognise claims of Aboriginal people to traditional land. Aboriginal squatters claimed part of the NT station, Wave Hill, but the Government’s decision meant that even if relinquished by the owners, it would not be reallocated to the Aboriginal people.

 

 

On this day 1992:

The Australian Indigenous Peoples Party was formally launched, at a meeting where every major Aboriginal and Islander community organisation from the Brisbane metropolitan area was represented.

 

On this day 1994:

Aboriginal athlete Cathy Freeman became the first runner to win a 200 and a 400 meters double at the Commonwealth Games.

AUGUST 28

Born on this day in 1988 AFL footballer Wade Thompson Port Adelaide footy club

On this day in 2001:

The opening day of the Kimberley region’s week long Aboriginal Law and Cultural Festival which attracted approximately 2,000 people from across the Kimberley region, representing 30 language groups. It is known to locals as Junba Nyanangarriyu Biya Yuwa or simply Biya Yuwa (pron: Bee Yay You  Way, this is short for, “Corroboree for Big Mob at 12 mile”).

 

Born on this day in 1987 AFL footballer Courtney Dempsey recruited by Essendon

On this day 1997:

The Federal Government would provide $1.5 million for a Queensland Indigenous Higher Education Centre specialising in health,

On this day 1998:

A two day meeting of over 70 members of the full council of the Northern Land Council reiterated its opposition to the establishment of 18 Northern Territory Land Councils, one of the recommendations contained in the then recently tabled Review of the Northern Territory Land Rights Act.

On this day 2002:

Sydney’s first Indigenous Employment Centre (IEC) was launched in Redfern with the aim of providing services to Indigenous job seekers who were ready to move from parttime, unskilled employment to more permanent work.

 

On this day 2003:

The Queensland Government announced Indigenous workers across the Torres Strait would learn valuable new skills and enjoy improved employment opportunities, following a State Government grant to the Island Coordinating Council.

On this day in 2010

The UN Committee on the Elimination of Racial Discrimination (CERD) delivers a damning report on Australia’s failure to meet international commitments on eliminating discrimination.

AUGUST 29

 

On this day 1837:

The Select Committee on Aborigines in the British Settlements tabled its report in the House of Commons. It noted that the invasion of Aboriginal lands by Europeans had intentionally or unintentionally led to the destruction of Aboriginal society, even genocide.

On this day 2000:

The National Native Title Tribunal hailed as an historic breakthrough the first agreement to formally recognise native title in Western Australia and the largest native title settlement in the nation. The decision involved 50,000 square kilometres, and a range of interests including 24 pastoral interests, 28 mining companies, Telstra, the Shire of Meekatharra and the Western Australian government.

On this day 2001:

Australia’s Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander youth cricket team held a moving ceremony at the gravesite of King Cole, a player who died on the original 1868 all Aboriginal tour 133 years previously.

 

 

On this day 2002:

The first International Desert Knowledge Symposium was held in Alice Springs to discuss issues surrounding traditional knowledge and culture.

 

On this day 2003:

A new study found the life expectancy of Aboriginal Australians was 20 years less than the general population.

AUGUST 30

 

On this day 1886:

Charlie Samuels from Jimbour Station near Dalby in Queensland outclassed his opponents in the final of the Eighth, Sir Joseph Banks Handicap sprint race at Carington Ground in Sydney.

 

On this day 1981:

Drilling operations started at Noonkanbah when a convoy of trucks under police escort was sent from Perth. The WA government was criticised by the UN following a visit by an Aboriginal delegation. No oil was found at Noonkanbah.

 

On this day 2001:

The release of a report which showed that Indigenous art accounted for $36 million or 17 per cent of total sales through commercial art galleries in Australia.

AUGUST 31

On this day in1834:

Captain Wiseman’s vessel, the ‘Augustus Caesar’ visited Nahgi Island, discovering ship wreckage but unable to find the source, and sighted islanders on a beach nearby. This was one of the last sightings of the Kulkalgal people, who after open conflict with white settlers, slowly declined in numbers.

 On this day in1931:

31,200 square miles of Arnhem Land was set aside for Aboriginal people.

On this day in2001:

The Full Court of the Federal Court handed down its decision in the appeal of Lorna Cubillo and Peter Gunner. The Full Federal Court agreed with the trial judge’s position that the Commonwealth was not liable to pay compensation to Mrs Cubillo or Mr Gunner who said they had been wrongfully and unjustifiably affected by past practices in the Northern Territory.

 On this day in2001:

The World Conference Against Racism, Racial Discrimination, Xenophobia and Related Intolerance (WCAR) began in Durban on this day. It was attended by ATSIC chair Geoff Clark along with ATSIC Commissioners Brian Butler and Commissioner Patricia Thompson. 

Black Jocks 20th- 25th August

AUGUST 20

 

Born on this day in 1980

AFL footballer Shannon Rusca recruited by Brisbane

On this day 1963:

Arnhem Land Aboriginal communities protested to Canberra about the handing over of land to bauxite mining concerns.

 

On this day 1997:

The release of a study into the social impact of development on Aboriginal communities in the Northern Territory’s Kakadu region by Environment Minister Robert Hill. A major report published on this day said mining, tourism and other developments in the Kakadu area have had virtually no benefits for the region’s Indigenous people.

On this day 1997:

The highly-acclaimed documentary “Mabo – Life of an Island Man

aired on ABC-TV.

 

On this day 1997:

27,000 Catholic school children gathered at Suncorp Stadium in

Brisbane to celebrate the process of reconciliation. In the front row, elders from the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community sat with children from as far afield as Gympie and the Gold Coast.

On this day 1998:

SOCOG President and minister for the Olympics Michael Knight announced that Olympic gold medallist Nova Peris Kneebone, the first Aboriginal athlete to win a gold medal, would be the first person in Australia to carry the Sydney 2000 Olympic Torch.

 

 

On this day 1998:

The 1998 Aboriginal Health Conference commenced at the Millennium Hotel, Sydney. Its purpose was to identify pathways for government, Aboriginal communities and the health industry to work together to achieve real improvements in the health status of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

On this day 2001:

The Australian youth cricket team defeated a Kent representative

On this day 2001:

An agreement was ratified to recognise the native title rights of the Tjurabalan traditional owners of a 26,000sq.km area of the Tanami Desert region, south of Halls Creek. It was the first negotiated settlement of a native title application by the newly elected Labor Government.

AUGUST 21

 

21 On this day 1945:

Arnold Lockyer, an Aboriginal airman who served as a flight engi-neer and air gunner, died on this day while a prisoner of war. His bomber was shot

down during an operation over the Celebes on 17 July.

 

On this day 1997:

Scenes from traditional children’s dreaming stories produced for television by the all-Aboriginal animation company,‘Aboriginal Nations’, were the sub-ject of a new Australia Post series.

 

 

Born on this day in 1958:

 Afl footballer Mark Williams played for Essendon and coached Port Adelaide.

On this day 1998:

One of Brisbane’s most significant Aboriginal meeting places was placed in the hands of its traditional owners following an historic decision by the Beattie Government. After 13 years of frustration and struggle by Brisbane’s Aboriginal commu-nity, a portion of land in Musgrave Park in South Brisbane was set aside under a special Deed of Grant in Trust to the Brisbane City Council for Aboriginal heritage, cultural and historical purpose.

 

 

On this day 1998:

The Full Court of the Federal Court dismissed an appeal by Mirrar Senior Traditional Owner, Yvonne Margarula, in one of several legal challenges to the validity of the proposed Jabiluka uranium mine.

 

 

On this day 1998:

 The Land Rights Act Review Report was tabled out of session in the Federal Parliament on this day, without the Northern Land Council’s knowledge.

On this day 2003:

Aboriginal and Torres Trait Islander cultural heritage in Queen-sland was afforded greater recognition and protection under new laws introduced to State Parliament on this day.

 

AUGUST 22

 

On this day 1770:

Captain James Cook had his first sightings of Torres Strait Islanders on (Possession) Island. Passing through the Strait aboard the ‘Endeavour’, Cook ob-served the primary food source of the Islanders as shellfish and noticed that they functioned as nomadic food gatherers rather than nomadic hunters. Cook further stated: “two or three of the men we saw yesterday had on pretty large breast plates which we supposed were made of Pearl Oyster shells, this as well as the bows and arrows before”.

 

On this day 1927:

Aboriginal people protested against the removal of sacred stones in central Australia by a tourist.

 

On this day 1996:

The Governor General of Australia stated that reconciliation be-tween Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Australians should be Australia’s prime objective in the years leading up to the year 2001.

 

On this day 1998:

Queensland Justice Minister Matt Foley handed over freehold title of five islands in the Torres Strait to their customary owners the Gau people. The islands are Bet and Poll Islets, which form part of the Warraber Island Deed of Grand in Trust, and Aureed, Roberts Islet and Saddle Island which were former reserves.

 

 

On this day 2002:

ATSIC congratulated the Northern Territory Government on the 2002/03 Budget, saying it was a further indication of the willingness of the NT Government to develop meaningful partnerships with Indigenous Territorians.

 

AUGUST 23

 

On this day 1937:

The first joint meeting of Torres Strait Islander community councillors at Masig (Yorke) Island.

On this day 1972:

The NSW Director General of Education approved the removal of the section of the teachers’ handbook that allowed school principals the right to refuse enrolment to Aboriginal children because of home conditions or substantial opposition from the community.

 

 

On this day 1996:

The Djomi Museum of Cultural Keeping Place of the Maningrida Aboriginal community, Arnhem Land, was officially opened.

On this day 1996:

Thirty years ago after Aboriginal stockmen and station hands went on strike at remote Wave Hill station and captured world headlines, it was announced the places associated with their walk-off were being considered for national heritage listing.

 

 

On this day 1998:

The Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Commission welcomed the Australian Olympic Committee’s decision to allow athletes to display the Aboriginal flag if they were to win a medal at the Sydney Olympics.

 

 

On this day 1872:

The Queensland Government passed laws extending theQueensland area of responsibility100km north of Cape York to the Torres Strait. This move was prompted by an increasing lawlessness in the Straits, and was proposed by Queensland Premier Palmer.

AUGUST 24

 

Born on this day NRL player Joel Thompson Canberra Raiders

On this day 1942:

Leonard Waters, from Nindigully near St George, Queensland, joined the RAAF on this day, working as ground staff and training as a flight mechanic. By December 1943 he had volunteered for air crew, had been selected and was training in Victoria. Studying at night to improve his chances, Waters excelled at the various courses, and was eventually selected as an elite fighter pilot.

 

On this day 1942:

Patrols of Aboriginal people were sent out to locate the enemy when the Commander at RAAF airbase, Emerald River Mission, Groote Eylandt, heard an unidentified plane.

On this day 1994:

Cathy Freeman became the first female Indigenous Australian to winan individual track gold medal at the Commonwealth Games in Canada.

 

AUGUST 25

 

On this day 1840:

Two Aboriginal people were hanged at Encounter Bay for their al-leged part in the murder of 24 crew and passengers after the brig Maria’ was wrecked on the Coorong.

On this day 2002:

Football lovers had a rare opportunity to witness Marn Grook the Aboriginal forerunner of Australian Rules Football at the Melbourne Cricket Ground. Fifty Indigenous footballers comprising a team from the Tiwi Islands and an ATSIC Chairman’s team combining Victorian and Northern Territory players demonstrated this spectacular and high-marking football game as a curtainraiser to the Collingwood & St Kilda clash.

 

On this day 1952:

It was reported that more than half the Aboriginal people in older settlements had tuberculosis.

Black Jocks 14th- 18th

AUGUST 14

On this day in 1963

The Yolngu people of Yirrkala sent a bark petitions to the Australian House of Representatives. The petition asserted that the Yolngu people owned that land and protested the Commonwealth’s granting of mining rights to Nabalco of land excised from Arnhem Land reserve. The result was a parliamentary inquiry which recommended that compensation was owed to the Yolngu. Thus, the petition was the first recognition of native title.

On this day 1824:

Governor Brisbane imposed martial law, because of his concern over reports of conflict around Bathurst resulting in seven Europeans and twice that number of Aboriginal people being killed.

Johnny Mullagh, Aboriginal cricketer, died

on this day in 1891.

On this day 1980:

Drillers refused to work the rig at Noonkanbah, Western Australia, in support of Aboriginal claims that it was a sacred site. As a result the State Government took over the rig and began drilling on August 22.

 

On this day 1997:

Redland Shire Council and Quandamooka Land Council Aboriginal Corporation signed Australia’s first agreement between a local government authority and a Native Title claimant, based on a common goal of ecologically sustainable development. The agreement titled the Native Title Process Agreement paved the way for the two councils to ensure North Stradbroke Island (Minjerribah) in Moreton Bay is pre-served for all future generations

 

AUGUST 15

 

On this day 1979:

A report announced that it would be at least 50 years before the Maralinga atomic test sites would be completely safe from radioactivity.

On this day 1996:

The House of Representatives Standing Committee was asked to inquire into and report on greater autonomy for Torres Strait Islanders.

On this day 1997:

The skull of Aboriginal resistance leader Yagan was exhumed from an English grave after months of lobbying by Aboriginal elders for its safe return to Australia.

On this day 1997:

Yanggarriny Wunungmurra was announced as the overall winner of the 14th National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Art Award.

AUGUST 16

 

The Coniston massacre, began from 16 August to 18 October 1928 near the Coniston cattle station, was the last known massacre of Indigenous Australians. People of the Warlpiri, Anmatyerre and Kaytetye groups were killed. The massacre occurred in revenge for the death of dingo hunter Frederick Brooks, killed by Aborigines in August 1928 at a place now known as Yukurru, (also known as Brooks Soak). Official records at the time stated that 31 people were killed. The then owner of Coniston station, Randall Stafford, was a member of the punitive party for the first few days and estimated that at least twice that number were killed between 14 August and 1 September. Historians estimate that at least 60 and as many as 110 Aboriginal men, women and children were killed.[1] The Warlpiri, Anmatyerre and Kaytetye believe that up to 170 died between 14 August and 18 October.

On this day 1968:

The Medical Congress was told Aboriginal infant deaths account for 10 per cent of all Australian deaths in that age group.

On this day 1975:

The Gurindji people of Northern Territory reclaimed 3,250 square-kilometers of tribal land from a British pastoral company at Wave Hill station now called Daguragu.

On this day 1981:

Champion Aboriginal rugby league brothers Gary, Glen and Mark Ella were all selected to play for the Wallabies in England. The three brothers created history, as they are the only group of brothers to be selected, and to play, for the Wallabies.

On this day 1987:

After Lloyd James Boney’s funeral came a fivehour series of clashes with police (including the Tactical Response Group). The Brewarrina Aboriginal community did not accept Boney’s death had been suicide.

On this day 2002:

The Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Commission of Western Australia revealed the Premier’s Office had invited ATSIC to work closely with government to address the problem of family violence and child abuse. The State Government invited ATSIC to have a presence on the Implementation Committee in line with Recommendation 143 of the Gordon Inquiry report.

AUGUST 17

AUGUST 18

 

On this day in 1978

 

The Tiwi island Land council was established The Tiwi Land Council was established following requests by the Tiwi people for recognition of their distinct geographic and cultural identity. These representations were a consequence of the Aboriginal Land Rights (Northern Territory) Act 1976

 

On this day 1996: A National Camp-in Protest

in Canberra at Old Parliament House commenced. People representing all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander organisations were requested to be prepared to stay for Tuesdaybudget day. ATSIC Board of Commissioners expressed fears that the government budget cuts would effectively spell the end of ATSIC and most community programs and organisations that ATSIC funds.

 

On this day 1997:

Burnam Burnam died on this day in 1997 aged 61 he was Woiworung and Yorta Yorta

On this day in 1997:

Mining companies including North Ltd and WMC Ltd agreed with Aboriginal groups on a blueprint to pave the way for mining exploration in the far western reaches of South Australia. North Ltd was one of fourteen mining companies involved in ongoing negotiations in a bid to streamline dealings with Aboriginal communities.

 

ON THIS DAY2003:

Queensland ATSIC commissioner Lionel Quartermaine was elected deputy and acting chairman of Australia’s peak Indigenous body.

Black Jocks 9th- 13th August

AUGUST 9

Born on this day in 1982 NRL player Justin Smith North Queensland Cowboys

On this day 1996:

Queenslander Steven McCarthy was announced as the 1996 winner of the national David Unaipon Award for previously unpublished Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander writers.

On this day in 1994:

International Day of Indigenous Peoples was proclaimed by the General United Nations General Assembly to be celebrated every year during the first International Decade of the World’s Indigenous People 1995 and continued until 2015 with the theme of “a decade of action and dignity”

On this day 1997:

“Reconciliation has been dealt another blow with the destruction of a Bora Ring in Redcliffe to make way for a new housing development”, Mr Nat Karmichael, Australian Democrats’ candidate for Redcliffe said “The sale of the land in Kippa-Ring to developer, Mr Bob Quinn, without the knowledge of Indigenous people, shows an extensive disregard for their views and cultural aspirations by the Catholic Church, the Red-cliffe City Council and the State Government”

On this day 1998:

Honouring Emily Kame Kngwarreye Alhalkere- Paintings from Utopia, a Queensland Art Gallery Travelling Exhibition, commenced at the National Gallery of Victoria.

On this day 2001:

Thousands of Indigenous performers from across Australia gathered in Alice Springs for the Yeperenye Federation Festival 2001 on the traditional lands of the Arrernte people.

AUGUST 10

On this day 1832:

In an attempt to learn more about Aboriginal language and culture, humanitarian Robert Lyon joined a group of Aboriginal people lead by resistance fighter Yagan, on a small island off the coast of Fremantle.

On this day 1839:

In New South Wales, the legislative council passed an Act allowing Aboriginal people to give evidence in criminal courts. The legislation was later found to be repugnant to British law and was disallowed.

On this day 1981:

The Aboriginal Lands Council met in Adelaide and called for a moratorium on uranium mining at Roxby Downs.

On this day 1997:

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Affairs Minister, Senator John Herron, announced that the review of the Aboriginal Land Rights Act (Northern Territory) 1976 would be headed by NT barrister John Reeves.

On this day 1998:

The Students for Land Justice and Reconciliation mini film festival “If Only You Knew .. Indigenous Struggles on Film’ was presented at Erwin Radio Theatre, Fitzroy.

On this day 2000:

ATSIC recommended that UNESCO place the Kakadu World Heritage Area on the “in danger” list as a matter of urgency.

On this day 2002:

The Traditional Aboriginal Rugby League Knockout Carnival now named “The Peoples Knockout” was hailed as a huge success, attracting 5000 people from around New South Wales.

 

AUGUST 11

Born on this day in 1977:

AFL player Byron Pickett, North Melbourne, Port Adelaide, Melbourne

On this day 1928:

The Sydney Morning Herald published details of what was to become known as the Conniston Massacre, with a police party killing 17 Aboriginal people as a reprisal for the killing of a white digger in Central Australia.

On this day 1998:

Local government delegates from around Australia gathered in Canberra for an Indigenous issues briefing ahead of the 1998 National General Assembly of Local Government. The Indigenous Issues Briefing had become an annual feature of the National General Assembly providing the opportunity for local Councils to discuss issues and opportunities to improve the planning, co-ordination and delivery of services to Indigenous communities.

On this day 1999:

ATSIC Chair Gatjil Djerrkura said a lack of proper consultation with the Australian people had sunk the referendum on the republic and the preamble. Mr Djerrkura said the preamble was meant to be an aspirational document to unite the nation, but had been drafted behind closed doors without any meaningful consultation with the Australian people, Indigenous and non-Indigenous.

On this day 1966: The Aboriginal Lands Trust Act 1966

was passed in South Australia. This law marked the first major recognition of Aboriginal Land rights by an Australian government.

On this day 2003:

It was announced that Uluru’s fastdisappearing rock art would be digitally recorded to preserve it for future generations.

 

AUGUST 12

 

Born on this day in 1973:

AFL footy player Lachlan Ross recruited to Essendon

On this day 1966:

The Aboriginal Lands Trust Act 1966 was passed in South Australia. This law marked the first major recognition of Aboriginal Land rights by an Australian government.

On this day 1998:

The Queensland Government set itself a four year target of doubling Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander representation in the State public sector.

On this day 2003:

It was announced that Uluru’s fastdisappearing rock art would be digitally recorded to preserve it for future generations.

 

AUGUST 13

 

Born on this day 1841:

Johnny Mullagh (Muarrinim), Aboriginal cricketer. Mullagh was an important figure in the first Australian cricket team to tour England.

On this day 1980:

Aboriginal people marched from Redfern to Parliament House to demonstrate support for the recommendations on land rights by the NSW Parliamentary Select Committee on Aborigines.

 

On this day 2002:

Key stakeholders joined action groups on in Cairns, Townsville and Mount Isa to help the Beattie Government develop local plans to address Indigenous homelessness.

Born on this day AFL footy player Jason Roe

recruited to Brisbane Lyons

On this day 2002:

Australian Football League star and Dockers player, Dale Kickett, was announced as one of the official ambassadors promoting the 2002 ATSIC Election campaign. Kickett joined an impressive list of outstanding Indigenous role models who encouraged Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people to check their enrolment details and vote in on 19 October.

 

On this day 2003:

Geoff Clark was suspended from his post as chairman of Australia’s peak Indigenous body ATSIC on the grounds of misbehaviour.

Black Jocks August 1st – 5th

AUGUST 1

On this day in 2007 Bruce Trevorrow is the first person to receive Stolen Generations compensation by a court. A court justice awarded him $525,000 for ‘pain, suffering and false imprisonment’

AUGUST 2

Born on this day in 1984 NRL football player Dane Nielson Melbourne Storm

Born on this day in 1984 NRL player Daine Laurie, Penrith panthers

On this day 1996: The High Court of Australia upheld a bid by the Waanyi people for a Native Title claim in north-west Queensland.

On this day 1998: The interim Chairperson of the North East Independent Body (NEIB), Mr Aubrey Lynch, announced that an agreement had been reached with a group of  13 mining companies on a process for identifying Aboriginal heritage sites.

On this day 1999: The Northern Land Council said that it was not surprised or sorry to hear of the resignation of Shane Stone as Chief Minister of the Northern Territory. NLC CEO Nor-man Fry said he believed that was a view shared by most Territorians.

On this day 2002: The Queensland Minister for Families and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Is-lander Policy Judy Spence opened nearly $2.5 million in infrastructure projects on Thursday Island, in the Torres Strait.

Born On this day in 1987 in Cloncurry Robert Crowther long jumper. His personal best is 8.05 metres, achieved at the 2011 Australian Athletics Championships in Melbourne.

AUGUST 3

Born on this day in 1989 AFL Footballer Sam Sheldon Recruited by Brisbane Lions

Born on this day in 1989 AFL Jeffery Garlett recruited by Carlton football club

On this day 1999: Ms Jackie Huggins, co-convenor of the Documents Committee of the Council for Aboriginal Reconciliation, held a press conference at Parliament House, Canberra. Ms Huggins outlined the process of nation-wide consultations with the aim of achieving the broadest possible support from indigenous Australians and the wider community on the Documents of Recon-ciliation.

On this day 2002: The fourth National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Visual

Arts Conference became one of the key events of the 2002 Adelaide Festival. The conference covered issues from intellectual and cultural property, representation, and on-the-ground issues for Indigenous artists.

On this day 2003: Plans were announced for an Aboriginal interpretive trail in Perth to link the Swan River, the cultural centre, East Perth and the foreshore within five years.

AUGUST 4

Born on this day AFL footballer Andrew McLeod AFL great played for the Adelaide Crows retired after a 340-game AFL career

On this day in1988 National Aboriginal and islander Children’s Day (NAICD) was officially launched by the secretariat National Aboriginal and Islander Child Care (SNAICC)

On this day 1937: policy of assimilation for ‘part-Aboriginal’ people to be mainstreamed into the white community was announced by the Federal Minister for Interior, at a conference attended by Federal and State officials.

On this day 1973: The reported Aboriginal population of Australia was 116,000 – with Queensland being the most populated state.

AUGUST 5

On this day 1876: Truganini the daughter of Mangana, chief of the Bruny Island tribe, died

On this day 1989: The Aboriginal Children’s Centre in Tasmania was opened in Hobart. On this day 1997: The amended Ten Point Wik Plan was released by the Federal Government and further elaborated in the Government’s Wik Task Force document: ‘Wik: The 10 Point Plan Explained’